Showing posts with label condors. Show all posts
Showing posts with label condors. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Talon on the Wing - Gigi Sedlmayer, Author

Semmelknödel    Dumplings
Semmelknödeln sind die ideale Beilage zu saftigen, sossigen Hauptspeisen.
Sie nehmen z.B. den Bratensaft gut auf und vermischen sich geschmacklich sehr gut mit dem Hauptgeschmack.
Mit diesem einfachen Rezept sollte es auch Ungeübten gelingen, leckere Semmelknödel selbst zu kochen.
Zutaten:  Ingredients:

(für 6 - 8 Knödel) -  ( for 6 – 8 )
6 Semmeln (Brötchen) vom Vortag  -  (6 buns form the day before)
1/8 l Milch (heiß)  -  (1/8 l milk)
1 kleine Zwiebel  -   (I small onion)
30 g Butter oder Margarine -   (30 gr Butter or Margarine)
2 EL gehackte Petersilie (glatt) -   (2 spoons parsley)
2 Eier  -  (2 eggs)
Muskatnuß gerieben  - ( nutmeg, shaved)
Pfeffer gemahlen   -   (Pepper)
Salz   -   (salt)
etwas Mehl   -  (some flower)
Zubereitung:   -   (Method)
Semmeln in dünne Scheiben schneiden und mit heißer Milch übergießen.
(Cut buns in thin slices then spill the hot milk over it)
Zwiebel in Würfel schneiden und in der heißen Butter oder Margarine glasig dünsten.
(Cut onions finely then roast in the butter or margarine.)
Petersilie kurz mitdünsten.
(Put the parsley with it)
Gedünstete Zwiebel/Petersilie unter die Semmelmasse mischen, die Eier untermischen, etwas ziehen lassen und anschließend kneten.
(Mix the onions into the buns mixture, then mix the eggs in. Let it stand for a while then knead the whole mixture with your hand.)
Bei Verwendung von trockenen Semmelwürfeln die Masse länger ziehen lassen und eventuell 1 - 2 EL Milch oder Wasser in die Knödelmasse geben.
(The mixture should be just right, not too thick and not too thin. If it is too thick then the dumplings will become too hard. If it is too thin, put some more bread in. or if it is too thick then put some more milk in.)

Mit Muskatnuß, Pfeffer und Salz kräftig abschmecken. Eventuell etwas Mehl über die Masse stauben um eine bessere Konsistenz zu erreichen (nicht zu viel, sonst werden die Knödel hart).
(To test put into the mixture nutmeg, pepper and salt) 
Mit feuchten Händen 6 - 8 etwa gleich große, feste Knödel formen und in Mehl wälzen.
(With wet hands form about 6 – 8 dumplings. They should all be the same size. Roll the dumplings in a bit flower.)
Ich selbst forme die Knödel neben leicht fließendem Wasser: wasche mir die Hände und forme einen Knödel mit feuchten Händen. Wälze den Knödel in Mehl auf einem Teller und lege ihn auf eine mehlbestaubte Fläche. Wasche mir wieder die Hände, forme den nächsten Knödel, ...
In kochendes Wasser legen und 20 Minuten ziehen lassen (nicht wallend kochen!).
(Boil water in a pot they all will fit in and put them in. When the water boils, put them slowly in and let them in for 20 minutes. Don’t let the water bubble all the time. )
Dabei darf der Topf nicht ganz zugedeckt sein! (z.B. Kochlöffel zwischen Topf und Deckel)
Turn down the heat and put the lid back on, but only halfway with maybe the wooden spoon between it)
Die Semmelknödel mit einem Schaumlöffel aus dem Wasser nehmen und baldigst servieren.
(When ready, take them out and enjoy them.)
Talon, On the Wing – Review by Martha A. Cheves, Author of Stir, Laugh, Repeat; Think With Your Taste Buds; A Book and A Dish

Crayn narrowed his eyes. ‘What is it, Mat?’
‘I just remembered something form yesterday. It was so funny, you know, when Talon stood by the door and banged his wings on the side of the door?’
‘He folded his wings to go through the door. Remember? But he probably wasn’t thinking about it. Neither did I. But since I was lying on him, his wings went over me, covering me. Not completely, because he stopped doing it when he felt me under them, I guess. So, I was, for a short time, buried under his wings. It felt so, so … it felt so warm, so secure, so safe and protected. Just lovely. Yes, it really was.’ A bright grin parted her face when she looked at her father.
‘Oh yeah, I can imagine it. When he folds his wings … yes, he does that.’ Crayn suddenly doubled up in laughter. “I actually saw it, but didn’t think about that.’ When they finally stopped laughing, they heard a crowd yelling.

Matica actually flys on the back of a Condor but not just any Condor, one she actually raised from an egg. She, her Mum, Dad and brother Aikon live in a remote village of Pucara in Peru. Her whole family was accepted by the Indians but not her. They shunned and avoided her because she was different. Matica has a growth problem. At the age of 5 she looked as though she was only 2. This to the Indians was a ‘bad’ sign so they kept their distance and refused to befriend her. But that all changed when she accidently ended up on the back of her Condor that she had named Talon. She then became someone special, not to just the Indians in her village but as word spread, to villages all around. People came from all over to hear her talk about her experience while soaring through the sky on Talon. Everyone loved her, that is except one. His name was Alexander and he would walk away from her when she tried to speak to him and become his friend. Puzzled, as well as hurt by his rejection, Matica became determined to learn why he hated her so much. Was he jealous or did he not believe that she actually flew? When Matica finally did learn his secret she was dumbfounded. She learned that he had a brother that was like her – little. But his brother had died and what bothered him most was how and why his brother died. But it went deeper because Alex blamed himself for his brother’s death. He should have prevented it from happening. So can Matica open Alex up and help him?

This is the 2nd volume in the Talon series and I have had the pleasure of reading both. The lessons taught within both books are priceless and very much needed in today’s world. The story teaches trust, which we all need more of. It teaches judgment, not just in what you say or do but also in how you actually judge others. It teaches patience, which is something I lack. It teaches love and forgiveness which everyone could use more of. This is a wonderful book to start reading as a bedtime story for young kids as well as a great story for older children to read on their own. Yes, we adults can learn from it too so I recommend it to all ages. And I must add that the story itself is one that I totally enjoyed too. A young girl that has befriended not only Talon who she raised but also his parent Condors who stick by her side as well as hers and show their appreciation for what she did for them.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Talon, come fly with me - Gigi Sedlmayer, Author

Hungarian Goulash – serves 4
(a Gigi Sedlmayer favorite)
800g Beef shin (cut into chunky cubes, seasoned with a little salt and pepper)
600g White Onions (sliced into rings)
1 pc Red Pepper (cut into small cubes)
3 pcs Tomatoes (cut into large cubes)
3 Tbsp. oil
1 Tbsp. Paprika
1 clove garlic (chopped finely)
1 tsp. Marjoram
1/4 tsp. Cumin seeds
2 Tbsp. Tomato Paste
1 Tbsp. Flour
1 litre Beef broth (from cubes)
1 pc Lemon Peel (from half of lemon)
Some Tabasco
1. Wash the meat, cut into cubes and season with salt and pepper.
2. Cut the onions in half and then thin rings.
3. Heat the oil and put the onions in the oil until they are glassy. Add the meat cubes and let it roast.
4. Mix the paprika, pepper pod, garlic, marjoram, cumin and tomato pulp. Add to the meat.
5. Roast at high heat. Add the flour, stir well and then the broth.
6. Add the tomatoes and the red pepper.
7. Close the saucepan and let the meat braise for 1 ½ hours on a low flame.
8. Season the goulash with paprika, Tabasco, lemon skin and salt & pepper.
9. Tastes better the next day. Add some sour cream for a creamier flavour.
Happy cooking!
My website:
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Talon, come fly with me – Review by Martha A. Cheves, Author of Stir, Laugh, Repeat; Think With Your Taste Buds; A Book and A Dish
The male condor spread his huge wings and hopped to the ground. Matica had to jump clear, out of the reach of his huge wings. Instead of flying off, as he normally did, he kept standing, turning around and looking at her. Matica’s eyes nearly popped out of her sockets. He’s so huge, she thought. Standing stock-still and not folding his wings to his body, the bird blinked and waited for what Matica would do. Since nothing happened for the next few minutes, the bird tilted his head and grunted. Matica interpreted it as: what now? His mate screeched from the sky in surprise. Matica couldn’t move. She was frozen stiff with fear and her face was as white as a ghost. The bird looked way bigger on the ground than he had looked on the branch. He folded his wings very slowly to his body now as if he knew he might frighten her, then he made another sound. Matica felt so small and thought: Will he kill me? But no, I’m alive. He can’t kill, just like Dad said. Matica gasped for air and her pink colour came back into her face. She was amazed that this had really happened and she wondered: What should I do now? I think he’s afraid of his own boldness, and so am I. He’s watching me. I should move, do something. After all, I told him to come down…but he’s so big.
Matica and her family moved from Australia to a little remote village called Pucara which is about twenty kilometers away from the Andes in the northern part of Peru. Matica’s parents are missionaries to the Peruvian Indians who spoke little or no English. Through her father Crayn, this has started to change.
Matica has a medical problem that prevents her body from growing to its normal size. When they first moved to Pucara Matica was five but her body looked as if she were only two years old. Even though Crayn had explained this disability to the Indians they still thought she was odd or even possessed by an evil spirit. They were so afraid of her that they refused to let their own children play with her. This left Matica alone and lonely. To solve her lack of friendship, Matica took to the sky, making friends with a pair of Condors.
When I started reading Talon, come fly with me, I knew nothing about the Condors. After reading Talon, come fly with me, I had to appease my curiosity by looking them up on the internet. They are large birds weighting from 20-23 lbs. with body lengths of 50” and wingspans of 9-10 feet. They mate for life and live 50 plus years producing 1-2 eggs every 2 years. They can fly up to 15,000 feet at speeds of 55 miles per hour. And they are on the endangered species.
Matica’s story of befriending these birds, helping them rescue their egg from poachers and then the actual raising was a story that took my breath away. Only a child such as Matica can see the beauty in an animal that everyone else calls ugly. And only a child would have the tolerance to do what had to be done to keep ‘her’ birds surviving. This is a beautiful book for all ages, especially for kids.

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